Category Archives: Silver People of Panama

A Colonial Legacy

Coming from a legacy of a colonial era gone by when betrayal and self-hatred was part of the way of life for our people, I could safely say that Iwas really suffering in its aftermath. It had begun leaving its imprint on us as individuals and as a community in many sickly ways. Even today we continue to manifest these traits of a disastrous inheritance leaving us as an unsound people. Continue reading

Calidonia and Christmas Bun

This little stand selling the precious Westindian style Bun was close to the entrance of "P" Street.

This little stand selling the precious Westindian style Bun was close to the entrance of “P” Street.

Raspadura or "dulce."  Nothing adds the distinctive flavor like Panamanian raspadura.

Raspadura or “dulce.” Nothing adds the distinctive flavor like Panamanian raspadura.

As we take a stroll down the busy streets of Calidonia here in downtown Panama City, I cannot help but remember how it was at one time in our country’s history when the Westindian presence more strongly flavored our National Character. Especially during Christmas, you can sense and appreciate the contribution our English and French speaking Antillean ancestors have left for us all to enjoy. Continue reading

Our Saints and Ancestors

The levitation of St. Martin de Porres. Image thanks to bylovealone.

Ancient graves of our Silver ancestors at Silver Corozal Cemetery in Ancón.

We want to exhort all of the Westindian community historically recognized as the original and de facto residents of the City of Colon and areas of Panama City and Bocas del Toro to make a special effort to honor their ancestors today, El Día de los Muertos.

In addition to being the main workers and builders of the first intercontinental railway in the americas, The Panama Railroad (1849-1855), they also sacrificed life and limb, en masse, to prosper the building of the Panama Canal on both instances of the French and American govenments and from both terminal cities of Colon and Panama. Continue reading

My Weakest Moment

Hoping that I would be safe there by that board building at that corner, darkness suddenly overcame me as if someone had turned off all the lights which scared me. I stood there allowing the fresh night air to help revive me and so it did. Continue reading

Major Transitions

Dwight D. Eisenhower, official White House portrait. Image thanks to Wikipedia.

The year 1953 was an eventful one as with most of the years ushering in the Baby Boomer generation.  Dwight D. Eisenhower was inaugurated as President of the United States of America, with Richard Nixon as his Vice President.  While there was a flaming Mau Mau uprising in the African colony of Kenya, most of Americans’ newfound joy, the television set, were tuned to “I Love Lucy,” the first real American sitcom. Continue reading

Our Encounter at Corozal Cemetery

Here we are, my Cousins, me and the ex-administrator strolling back down from Section M in Corozal Cemetery.

On Friday March 23, 2012 I decided to take my cousins on a promised visit to one of the cemeteries where the bones of their ancestors rest and which, by the way, now belongs to the three cemeteries protected by our Silver People Law.  The Law was newly passed by the National Assembly on March 1, 2012, so this would be a perfect time to visit Corozal Cemetery.  There rests our Uncles Eric J. Reid, Vincent (Vicente) Reid, my grandmother, Fanny Elizabeth M. Reid and several of my aunts on my maternal side.  We were met with a surprise visitor. Continue reading